Archiv des Autors: Markus Bühler

The Huchen – Salmonid King of the Danube

If you are interested in unusual freshwater fish, you have possibly heard about the taimen (Hucho taimen), a very large predatory salmonid which lives in remote parts of Mongolia, Russia and some other areas of North Asia. This species was … Weiterlesen

Veröffentlicht unter Blogposts in English, Fische, Megafische | 2 Kommentare

When Giant Tunas roamed the Baltic Sea

In terms of zoological diversity, the Baltic Sea is probably the most boring sea of the world. It has the lowest salinity of all seas and it is only connected with one other sea, the North Sea. As a result … Weiterlesen

Veröffentlicht unter ausgerottete Arten, Blogposts in English, Fische, Megafauna, Megafische | 2 Kommentare

Zoological treasures in Archeological, Historical and Ethnological Museums

This blog is devoted to the wonders and marvels of the animal kingdom and natural history. Many of the photos in my articles were taken in zoological or paleontological museums. But you can also often find a lot of really … Weiterlesen

Veröffentlicht unter Archeology, ausgerottete Arten, Ethnology, Säugetiere, Wale | 2 Kommentare

A moustache for the elephant bird – had Aepyornis facial bristles?

A recent study in which digital endocasts of elephant bird skulls from Madagascar were examined, has shown that those gigantic flightless birds had extremely reduced optical lobes. At the same time, their olfactory lobes were very large, what indicates that … Weiterlesen

Veröffentlicht unter ausgerottete Arten, Megafauna, Vögel | Hinterlasse einen Kommentar

The amazing Nautilid Diversity of the Post-Cretaceous Seas

The modern nautilus is usually seen as some sort of archaic relic from an ancient era, unaffected by the changes of time. They are often considered as an anachronistic remnant of an age when the seas were populated by marine … Weiterlesen

Veröffentlicht unter Cephalopoden, Paläontologie, Populäre Irrtümer | Hinterlasse einen Kommentar

The Narwhal´s lesser Tusk

I have seen a whole lot of narwhal tusks in museums, many skulls of narwhals (Monodon monoceros), some fully mounted narwhal skeletons and even several specimens with  double tusks. But so far I have never ever seen the vestigal right … Weiterlesen

Veröffentlicht unter Anatomie, Wale | 2 Kommentare

A new model of Meyerasaurus – or how to bodypaint a plesiosaur

Today I wanted to show you some photos of a life-sized model of Meyerasaurus, a rhomaleosaurid from the Toracian stage of the early Jurassic, whose fossils were found at Holzmaden. The model was made by my friends from kamyk.pl, a … Weiterlesen

Veröffentlicht unter Evolution, Fische, Haie und andere Knorpelfische, Paläontologie, Skulpturen, Wale | Hinterlasse einen Kommentar

A King of Cods

Today I want to show you a „Dorschkönig“ or „king of cods“ from the collection of the Zoological Museum Kiel: „King of cods“  was the Name given by fishermen to Atlantic cods (Gabus morhua) with a rare cranial malformation of … Weiterlesen

Veröffentlicht unter Bild des Tages, Fische, Teratologie | Hinterlasse einen Kommentar

The bearded Leviathan – not your everyday Basilosaurus

Basilosaurus – the great mammalian leviathan of the Eocene – was beyond doubt one of the most spectacular creatures which ever swam the oceans of the world.  But despite the fact that fossils of this ancient cetacean have been known … Weiterlesen

Veröffentlicht unter Paläontologie, Populäre Irrtümer, Säugetiere, Wale | Hinterlasse einen Kommentar

Why maned lionesses are not that special (and why they don´t baffle scientists)

Perhaps you have heard about the recent report about a lioness at Oklahoma City Zoo, which „mysteriously“ grew a mane. As usual „scientists are baffled“, at least according to the news-site which spreads the story.  However, the whole case is … Weiterlesen

Veröffentlicht unter Populäre Irrtümer, Säugetiere, Teratologie | Hinterlasse einen Kommentar